2016 MLB Draft Scouting Report: Bryan Reynolds

By: Burke Granger

Bryan Reynolds – OF – Vanderbilt.  6’2″ 210.  Bats: Switch.  Throws: Right.  Class: Junior.  DOB: January 27, 1995.  Last Drafted:  Never.

Scouted:  Vanderbilt @ Kentucky 5/1-5/3, 2015.

Though he was not highly regarded coming out of Brentwood H.S. (Tenn.), Reynolds burst onto the scene for the 2014 national champion Commodores as a freshman.  He led the team in hitting (.338), ahead of then sophomore Dansby Swanson (.333) on his way to a Freshman All-American season.

Capping off his freshman season in style, Reynolds joined Swanson, Carson Fulmer and Walker Buehler playing for the Collegiate National Team where he hit .246/.358/.351.

Reynolds regressed a little bit with the bat in his sophomore campaign.  While his K/BB ratio remained fairly steady (2.13 in 2014 and 2.16 in 2015), his K rate jumped from 15.4% as a freshman to 20.5% as a sophomore.  The increase in K rate was a contributing factor in the 20 point drop in Reynolds’ batting average.

Reynolds faired well in the Cape Cod League in 2015.  Playing for the Orleans Firebirds, he  hit .346 while walking (17) more than he struck out (14).

STATISTICS

YEAR
AVE
OBP
SLG
2B
3B
HR
RBI
BB
K
SB/ATT
2014
.338
.395
.480
24
2
4
54
23
49
14/20
2015
.318
.388
.462
18
4
5
49
31
67
17/19
2016
.330
.461
.603
16
3
13
57
49
58
8/13
HITTING –A switch hitter, Reynolds projects to hit for average at the next level.  He steps toward the mound before the pitcher releases the ball and gets himself in position to rotate his hips early.  While this approach may limit his power potential, it appears to allow Reynolds to keep his weight back and spit at off speed pitches out of the zone.  Reynolds starts with a slightly open stance, but closes in time to cover the outer half of the plate.  If anything, he’s susceptible to fastballs in the lower-inner quadrant.  The walk rate is solid (9.6%), but as mentioned, he struck out in a fifth of his plate appearances in the 2015 season.
POWER – Reynolds approach results in gap to gap doubles power, but he does have the ability to pull pitches over the fence.  A swift compact swing does cause the ball to jump off the aluminum bats, but he was held without a HR using wood bats in the Cape Cod League last season.
SPEED – Though he’s just an average runner, Reynolds has quickness and instincts that play up in the field and on the bases.
ARM – Primarily a center fielder, there is some question as to whether the arm is playable there as a professional, which could prompt a move to left-field.
DEFENSE – Reynolds has great first step quickness and reads the ball well off the bat.  These instincts allow him to adequately cover the gaps and make difficult plays look easy.
FUTURE – In a college outfield class stacked with talent, Reynolds lack of a standout tool limits his ceiling by comparison of his toolsy peers, though the polish of the hit tool and simple approach gives him a higher floor.
Reynolds enters the year as a consensus top 15 college prospect in the industry, which indicates that there is a high chance he’ll be selected in the first round.  I see him as having first division regular potential (with a 4th outfielder floor), who will hit for average.  With an arm that may limit him to left field, he’ll need to develop more power to fit the mold and live up to that potential.

DISCLAIMER:  It’s important to note that Reynolds has about 70 games left to play during his junior season, so I’ll reserve the right to amend this report as the season progresses.  It’s also important to note that I’m not a trained scout.  I do however actually go to see these guys play live, which is more than you’ll get from many online “Scouting Reports”.  I also talk to scouts when I’m there.  While scouts reserve their reports for their employer, I can share my thoughts with you, the reader.
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